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Long-lasting lipstick – professional tips for soft lips!

You’ve tried all the tricks, but you still can’t keep the lipstick in place. Here are some tricks from the pros that you might not have heard of.

Use a lip pencil of the same brand as the lipstick.

Each brand has a unique product base and color formula. Using two different brands can cause product incompatibility. Lips also add versatility to the end result of your product. For example, using a nude liner with a red will give you a softer, softer shade than a red liner.

Do not use a lip brush. Use the lip color directly from the tube. You usually see makeup artists using lip brushes because it’s the only clean way to apply lipstick from a tube for many people. You can disinfect the brush, not the lipstick tube! By using directly from the tube, you get a larger amount of color and the application time is faster. If your lipstick is lopsided in shape, take the part of the photo where the ribbon is attached and tilt it. (The grains are very thick).

Beware of lip seals!

They are great for sweet and full lips, but eat the color of most lipsticks. Look for tinted lip liners. Try a lip stain. Lip stains are good for hints of color. They improve the natural color of the lip colour tattoo and dry to a matte finish. They are great for all-day wear, but can be drying. Use natural overnight moisturizing lip treatments.

Clean your lips once a week. Once the surface is ready, the lipstick always stays on better, especially for people with dry lips. Exfoliation also helps increase circulation, giving you a fuller, healthier smile!

No one knows when the first tattoos were done with ink. Ancient tattoos are often preserved when the skin is mummified or preserved in snow or peat.

Pacific Islands

The word tattoo appears to be derived from the Tahitian word tutu, meaning “marking”. Most Pacific cultures believe that a tattoo makes a person strong or powerful spiritually and socially, allowing the body to channel its energy between the human and spiritual dimensions.

Maori men tattoo their faces with passionate expressions and Maori women their lips and chins. These tattoos are hammered into the flesh with a bone chisel and the cuts are colored with ink. In Samoa this tattoo represents the ability to endure pain and is still true today, and in the tattoo is believed to be ten thousand years old.

There is evidence that prior to the arrival of the (in 1519) tattoos and body painting were widely used and were mainly used for social and religious purposes (not just decorative purposes). The arrival of the also meant the rapid decline and extinction of many indigenous cultures, depriving them of knowledge of what they looked like and how they were practiced.

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